Bentwood spiral by Gebruder Thonet, ca. 1885 (SLAM 273:2001) (at Saint Louis Art Museum)

Bentwood spiral by Gebruder Thonet, ca. 1885 (SLAM 273:2001) (at Saint Louis Art Museum)

Delaminated door.

Delaminated door.

at Saint Louis Art Museum

at Saint Louis Art Museum

Terracotta panel from Harry B. Wheelock’s Western Methodist Book Concern (1990.571.1-4)
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/146806  (at The Art Institute of Chicago)

Terracotta panel from Harry B. Wheelock’s Western Methodist Book Concern (1990.571.1-4)
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/146806 (at The Art Institute of Chicago)

digitizingmillerhouseandgarden:

Meet the team: Amy Auscherman

Title: Archives Assistant

How I got here: I am a life-long Indiana resident and began at the IMA as an intern in the Stout Reference Library in 2011. My educational background includes a BA in Art History and I’m currently finishing my Masters of Library Science at Indiana University Bloomington. There I have focused my studies on special collections libraries. Before coming to the IMA, I worked for four years at the Lilly Library, IU’s rare book and manuscript library, and handled everything from artist’s books by Max Ernst to locks of Sylvia Plath’s hair. My love and knowledge of modern architecture and design, paired with my experience in special collections, prepared me for this current dream job.

Documenting Modern Living duties: Scanning Miller House and Garden Collection material; metadata entry into Archon; main contributor to Tumblr.

Favorite MHGC find: Some of the material I find most interesting in the Miller House and Garden collection  is related to projects that were never realized, or that ended up completely different than the original proposal. The hand-painted board by Alexander Girard (pictured above) was presented as a design option for the kitchen rug, but was rejected by Xenia Miller. The geometric design Girard originally proposed is vastly different than the cool-colored, more abstract design that ended up living on the kitchen floor. We haven’t properly photographed the item yet, but wanted to share this sneak-peek detail shot of the board.

Best thing about my job: I love that I’ve been able to work solely with this incredibly rich collection. The best part has been sharing with others, via this blog, the amazing material that, until this digitization project, was only enjoyed by a handful of people. Another huge job perk is being able to walk around the IMA’s galleries and campus during my lunch breaks.

Favorite item in the IMA collection: It’s hard to choose, but I find myself often visiting Fernand Léger’s Man and Woman.

When I’m not working, I’m probably doing this: Scouring a library book sale or used book shop, looking for books with covers designed by my favorite mid-century graphic designers.

Follow Amy Auscherman on Twitter @acid_free

Night sky (at Burkhardt Building)

Night sky (at Burkhardt Building)

Jigsaw bug.

Jigsaw bug.

theartassignment:

Episode 1 is live! Join hosts Sarah Urist Green and John Green as they meet artists Douglas Paulson and Christopher Robbins and follow them as they Meet in the Middle. Then it’s your turn! Do the assignment, post your results to the social media platform of your choice, and tag it with #theartassignment. Your work may be included in a future episode. (Get started by calculating the midpoint between you and a friend. Or an enemy.) 

And please subscribe! We’ll post a new video each week. 

The Art Assignment’s first assignment! 

For much of the winter deer having been passing through the woods nibbling on vines.

For much of the winter deer having been passing through the woods nibbling on vines.

Detail of “Multicolored Tournament” by Stefan and Helena Galkowski (Indianapolis Museum of Art 2013.1).
A while back over on the Documenting Modern Living tumblr page, they were featuring textiles Alexander Girard selected for the Miller House’s conversation pit. This fall the Galkowski “Multicolored Tournament” was installed on the wall next to the conversation pit. The Millers purchased this textile from Cepelia Corporation in New York in August 1960. 
An article in Life magazine in 1961 has a photograph by Frank Scherschel with J. Irwin and Xenia Miller sitting in the conversation pit with the textile behind them. John Brooks writing for The New Yorker profiled Cepelia in the magazine’s Talk of the Town section on 23 April 1960.

Detail of “Multicolored Tournament” by Stefan and Helena Galkowski (Indianapolis Museum of Art 2013.1).

A while back over on the Documenting Modern Living tumblr page, they were featuring textiles Alexander Girard selected for the Miller House’s conversation pit. This fall the Galkowski “Multicolored Tournament” was installed on the wall next to the conversation pit. The Millers purchased this textile from Cepelia Corporation in New York in August 1960. 

An article in Life magazine in 1961 has a photograph by Frank Scherschel with J. Irwin and Xenia Miller sitting in the conversation pit with the textile behind them. John Brooks writing for The New Yorker profiled Cepelia in the magazine’s Talk of the Town section on 23 April 1960.